FAQ - Pegasus Material Handling

FAQ

Below are some of the most common questions regarding Thorough Examinations and CFTS Please click on the question to reveal the answer.

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Thorough Examination is a bit like a car’s MOT.Both a Thorough Examination and an MOT are means of certifying that, at the time of testing, all components which have a bearing on safety have been formally inspected and assessed as being in a safe condition.Just as a car’s MOT and 10,000 mile service are two different things, so Thorough Examination is distinctly separate from a truck’s regular maintenance programme (even though in both cars and trucks some of the same items are included in both regimes). It is not part of maintenance – it is an examination embedded in legislation. As a result, Thorough Examination would not normally be included in a maintenance agreement, unless specifically requested
Yes. It is required under two pieces of Health and Safety legislation: LOLER 98 (Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998) – which covers lifting components. PUWER 98 (Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998) – which deals with all other safety-related items, such as brakes, steering and tyres. Importantly, however, the new accredited scheme for Thorough Examination does more than just meet the minimum legal requirements.
Every truck you have in service, including hired trucks, must have a current Report of Thorough Examination. This is akin to the MOT certificate. (The only exceptions are brand new trucks, although these must be subject to Thorough Examination at some point within a year of their acquisition.) The document must be headed Report of Thorough Examination. It must comply with Schedule 1 of LOLER 98. You must be able to produce it when required to do so by an enforcement officer. The responsibility for obtaining this Report of Thorough Examination lies with you, the user of the truck (whether you own, lease or hire). The only exception may be for a truck operating under a short-term contract of less than a year, in which case the hiring company should provide you with a copy of the current report of Thorough Examination.
At least every 12 months. Depending on the application, the intensity of use and the nature of any attachments, the regulations may require this interval to be reduced to 6 or even 4 months. The person carrying out the Thorough Examination – the ‘Competent Person’ – will be able to determine the appropriate interval. The same person should also be consulted for advice on whether planned changes to the truck’s operation or configuration will alter this interval.
under LOLER 98, lifting parts such as: •mast •chains •carriage •forks •tilt mechanism under PUWER 98, other parts such as •overhead guard •steering •seat mountings •tyres •brakes Detailed measurements are taken to identify wear and damage to chains and forks. Particularly close inspection is made of components such as: •chain-retaining bolts •mast •carriage The intensity of examination – and the time taken – is much greater than in an MOT.
If the defects do not immediately affect safety, a Report of Thorough Examination will still be issued. However, it will identify the defects and state a time by which they must be rectified. The user is responsible for ensuring that the necessary repairs are undertaken within that time. If the defects are imminently dangerous, the report will state that the equipment must not be used until they have been rectified. This report will normally be copied to the local enforcing authority
Someone designated as a Competent Person under the terms of the regulations. To be designated, the examiner must have had appropriate experience and training.
First of all, it should be recognised that only people and organisations with close involvement in working with fork lifts can claim the necessary intimate knowledge to deliver Thorough Examination effectively. The new system was developed to offer a single definitive process – and resulting quality mark – that had the backing of the two industry trade organisations dedicated to setting and raising standards in the fork lift truck industry. Importantly, it was developed in full co-operation with the Health and Safety Executive. How does the Thorough Examination scheme offered by CFTS differ from other schemes? First of all, it should be recognised that only people and organisations with close involvement in working with fork lifts can claim the necessary intimate knowledge to deliver Thorough Examination effectively. The new system was developed to offer a single definitive process – and resulting quality mark – that had the backing of the two industry trade organisations dedicated to setting and raising standards in the fork lift truck industry. Importantly, it was developed in full co-operation with the Health and Safety Executive.